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Law Library News

Law Library News Archive

November 24, 2003
Sarah Hollingsworth, Editor


 

FINDING YOUR WAY FROM A TO Z  

 

You’ve found a great source in MARIAN, the Library’s catalog, and you have the call number in hand – now where do you go? The Library Staff has been putting together maps of both floors of the Law Library showing the flow of the call numbers through the stacks.
 

 

A draft of this work in progress can be found at the Circulation Desk and in the Reference Office. Soon, final versions will be posted, in print and online.  For the current online edition, go to the Law Library's homepage at http://lib.law.washington.edu/ and look under "Quick Info," for the link to Library Maps. 

 

 

 

THE EXAM SEASON COMETH 

Law school exams are notoriously ambiguous and this quarter's exam period, to paraphrase Justice Holmes, is a brooding omnipresence in the Thanksgiving sky.  The last day of classes is December 10 and the exam period runs from December 15 through December 20.  You can find the Final Exam Schedule for the Fall Quarter 2003, online at http://www.law.washington.edu/Students/examSchedule.html.

 The key to getting a grip on the menacing combination of ambiguity and dread is to face the inevitability head on and take positive steps now to position yourself to write the best exams you possibly can.  There are several approaches you can take toward this end.

One of the tried and true ways of meeting law school exams head-on is to take a look at some of those given in the past by your professors.  You can find old UW Law School exams (including some with answers) organized by professor and course title at http://lib.law.washington.edu/exams2/exams.html

An important online resource for law school exams is an online tutorial provided through the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) called Writing Better Law School Exams: The Importance of Structure by UW Law Professor William Andersen.  CALI describes this tutorial: 

The program begins with an explicit discussion of [legal writing] form, and the structural implications it has. Within that specific context, the program goes on to discuss the tasks to be performed, the tools used in performing those tasks, and methods of sharpening those tools. The program concludes with some interactive opportunities to try the techniques described.

You can access Professor Andersen's tutorial at http://lessons.cali.org/cat-exam.html; it will take you approximately one and a half hours to complete.  You will need a CALI password to access the lessons; you can get it by contacting the Reference Office (lawrefst@u.washington.edu or 543.6794).

The University of Pittsburgh School of Law maintains a web page, http://jurist.law.pitt.edu/exams.htm, dedicated to law school exams.  JURIST includes a list of essays by law professors and outline publishers (as well as one link to a streaming video exam-taking lecture from the University of Illinois College of Law). Not quite as thrilling as the newest Grisham novel, but hey, you can't have everything.  JURIST also provides links to fifteen law schools throughout the nation that have posted "old" exams on the web. 

And for those who continue to prefer the look and feel of paper, Gallagher Law Library provides an abundance of exam-taking resources in print format: 

 

THANKSGIVING LIBRARY HOURS 

Dates

Library

Reference

Copy Center

East Asian Law Dept.

Wed.

Nov. 26

8 am – 5 pm

9 am – 5 pm

8 am – 5 pm

8 am – 4 pm

Thurs.

Nov. 27

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Fri.

Nov. 28

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Sat.

Nov. 29

11 am – 6 pm

1 pm – 4 pm

11 am – 5 pm

Closed

Sun.

Nov. 30

11 am – 11 pm

1 pm – 6 pm

11 am – 5 pm

Closed

  


Libraries will get you through times of no money better than money will get you through times of no libraries.

---Anne Herbert,
The Whole Earth Catalog