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Law Library News for November 13, 2000

Ann Hemmens, editor

Law Library News Archive

 

Election Results on the Web

The elections at the federal, state and local levels were very close this year. Where can you find current election results on the Web? Try some of these sites.

The Washington Secretary of State�s website, http://www.vote.wa.gov/vote2000/results/index.tpl, provides results for the November 7th general election, including federal election information as well as statewide ballot measures and legislative and judicial positions. King County�s website, http://www.metrokc.gov/elections/2000nov/nov.htm, also offers national and local election results, including the Presidential, Senatorial and Congressional races and statewide initiatives and city propositions. For a national focus check out the Washington Post "On Politics" section, http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/front.htm

Of course, local newspapers are great sources for election coverage. Try the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, http://seattlep-i.nwsource.com/election2000/, and the Seattle Times, http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/index.html.

If you want an even bigger picture, find election information from around the world at this website: http://www.agora.stm.it/elections/.

What's This *%&!@+ About an Electoral College?

by Cheryl Nyberg

Yes Virginia, the U.S. President is elected not by the popular vote taken on the first Tuesday in November but by the vote of the mysterious and little-understood electoral college.

The U.S. Electoral College homepage, maintained by the National Archives and Records Administration, provides a wealth of information about its composition, function, statistics, and history. Especially useful is the Procedural Guide to the Electoral College.

Why did the Founding Fathers find the need to create the Electoral College? Several of Alexander Hamilton's contributions to the Federalist Papers address this question. You can search the text of the Federalist Papers on the Thomas website.

The U.S. Constitution (Article II, section 1, clause 2) leaves to the states the matter of how electors should be appointed. A Senate Document called Nomination and Election of the President and Vice President of the United States includes the states' laws on the nomination and election of presidential electors. This document is available on the Web via GPO Access, http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/cong006.html. Search for Senate Documents from the 106th Congress, using the search "nomination and election." S.Doc. 106-16 is the correct item. Select the PDF option and go to page 322 of 425 to view the pages that deal with state laws on electors.

Washington State's laws on electors is found at RCW 29A.310 - .360. Political parties nominate presidential electors and file certificates with the Secretary of State. Oddly enough, this information is not routinely published. The names are not on the Secretary of State's website or on the websites of the Washington State Democratic or Republican parties. The Secretary of State's office kindly faxed the following lists of Democratic and Republican electors; their names and cities of residence are:

Democratic Electors

Republican Electors

Debbie Aldrich, Bow Ron Averill, Centralia
Vic Battson, Seattle Ted Choi, Seattle
Charlotte Coker, Spokane Frankie DeWitt, Yakima
Jim Frush, Bainbridge Island Lindsey Echelbarger, Edmonds
Tim Hattenburg, Spokane Beth Jensen, Tacoma
Rachel Lake, Lake Forest Park Steve Johnson, Kent
Nancy McGinnis, Tacoma Rich Kuling, Spokane
Carol Sue Perkins, Pasco Jennifer Mayer, Burien
Debbie Regala, Tacoma Patrick Plumb, Tonasket
Carl Schwartz, Seattle Evelyn Spencer, Everett
Paul Steinberg, Vancouver Dorothy Zimmerman, Mukilteo

By the way, the list of Florida's electors can be found at the Florida Secretary of State's website, http://election.dos.state.fl.us/2000elec/Electors2000/2000electors.shtml.

We're Wired!

The 38 study carrels on the 4th floor of the Law Library are now wired so students with laptop computers and an Ethernet card can access the Internet and E-mail! To gain access after installing your Ethernet card, you will need to install IP services, and enable DHCP.

Please direct questions regarding access to Tim Vanderhoff, Network Administrator (Room 317; tvander@u.washington.edu) or lawhelp@u.washington.edu. Note that there is no printing capability provided by this laptop access; you will need to download the files to a disk for printing in the computer lab on the 2nd floor. Please do not leave your valuables unattended.