bricks, bytes and continuous renovation Seattle University School of Law University of Washington School of Law

Conference Sessions by Presenter

Index (click on presentation title to jump to abstract)

Abstracts

Plenary Session I - Law School Facilities

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There is little doubt that every project to reconstruct, renovate, or even update your law school will be challenged by escalating costs, budget cuts, and perhaps schedule delays. Yet, at the same time, every project must be seen as an opportunity that can not be wasted. Behind any great endeavor there is a vision or an image which energizes the process. How can the design team work with the client to understand the dream and develop the strategies to realize every essential part of the dream?

Edward Tsoi, Senior Principal Tsoi / Kobus & Associates, One Brattle Square, P.O. Box 9114, Cambridge, MA 02238-9114, Main: 617-475-4000, Fax: 617-475-4363, www.tka-architects.com

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Plenary Session II - Future of the Law Library

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For most of our history, the book has defined library space. We’ve built our libraries to house them, secure them, preserve them and make them accessible for use. Now access to electronic information sources permits less dependence on print collections, and consequently, engenders new thinking on law library design. Books are not going away, but they no longer need be the dominate factor in library space design nor should books continue to shape perceptions of the law library’s role in the legal academy. It’s time for us to reevaluate the current “book-centered” design models and to speculate on the possible ways library space can be used to further invigorate the intellectual life of the legal academy.

Janis L. Johnston, Director, Associate Professor of Law, Associate Professor of Library Administration, Richard W. and Marie L. Corman Scholar in Law, University of Illinois, Albert E. Jenner, Jr. Memorial Law Library 142M Law, Building 504 E. Pennsylvania Ave. Champaign, IL 61820, 217-244-3046, Fax: 217-244-8500, jljohnst@law.uiuc.edu

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Plenary Session III - Future of Legal Education

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Effective planning for future building and technology design must begin with an eye to the future of legal education. It is indeed dangerous to drive by the rear-view mirror— with one’s attention focused on the past rather than the future. The forms, functions, and objectives of legal education should, first and foremost, drive design. Dean Kellye Y. Testy will lead this plenary session, outlining three key trends in legal education that will inform its future direction. She will also focus on the humanity that is central to law and legal education—too often neglected when consideration of “Bricks & Bytes” takes center stage in strategic planning efforts. Her opening remarks will be followed by brief reflections from a judge, an academic, and a recent graduate; the audience then will be invited to participate in a closing roundtable discussion with all participants.

Kellye Y. Testy, Dean and Professor of Law, Seattle University School of Law, 901 12 th Ave., Sullivan Hall, P.O. Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090, 206-398-4309, ktesty@seattleu.edu

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A1 - Classroom Design and Construction

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What does the ideal law school classroom look like? What shapes and design elements make a classroom conducive to legal education? How best can technology be implemented in the law classroom? This program will discuss those questions. The presenters have extensive experience in working with architects and technology consultants in designing classrooms, including both renovations and new construction.

Richard A. Danner, Senior Associate Dean for Information Services, Archibald C. & Frances Fulk Rufty, Research Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law, Box 90361, Durham NC 27708-0361, 919-613-7115, Fax: 919-613-7237, Danner@law.duke.edu, www.law.duke.edu/fac/danner

Thomas B. Metzloff, Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law, Box 90360 Durham, NC 27708-0360, 919-613-7055, metzloff@law.duke.edu, www.law.duke.edu/fac/metzloff

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A2 - All Points Are Not Created Equal: A Pragmatic Approach to Sustainability

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A “high performance builder” with higher education experience (including Emory University, a leader in environmental sustainability) will examine the initial decision to seek LEEDS or an alternative green certification, including, the economic and political implications of that decision and the special factors present in academic construction where longer paybacks may be tolerated but continuing maintenance expenses are extremely important. The interest of law school faculty and students in environmentally sound construction provides an additional incentive for going green. Holder Construction Company has developed a collective matrix of all of its academic projects that divides points into 1) those that can be achieved at low cost with good planning; 2) those with additional upfront costs and a 1-2 year payback; and 3) those with a 10 year or longer payback that are part of platinum certification.

Andrew C. Yantis, Jr ., Senior Vice President for Operations, Holder Construction Company, 3333 Riverwood Parkway, Ste. 400, Atlanta, Georgia 30339, 770-988-3264, Fax: 770-988-3265, dyantis@holder.com

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A3 - The Place of Art in Law School Design

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Gates Hall Slideshow [Windows Media .wmv]

Dean Rudolph C. Hasl will coordinate a discussion about the acquisition and placement of art in the construction or renovation of physical facilities, drawing on the experience of both the University of Washington and Seattle University. Issues will include the determination of what art will be included, who should be involved in the decision making, what themes might be used to give coherence to the collection, whether an art consultant should be hired, who should be responsible for maintaining the collection, and other issues. The audience members will be asked to share their experiences with the inclusion of art as a part of the building process.

Rudolph C. Hasl, Dean & President, Thomas Jefferson School of Law, 2121 San Diego Ave., San Diego, CA 92110, 619-297-9700, hasl@tjsl.edu

W.H. Knight, Jr. (Joe), Dean, University of Washington School of Law, William H. Gates Hall, Box 353020, Seattle, WA 98195, 206-685-3846, Fax: 206-616-5305, whknight@u.washington.edu

Kathie Price, Associate Dean for Library and Technology and Clarence J. TeSelle, Professor of Law, Fredric G. Levin College of Law, University of Florida, PO Box 117620, Gainesville, FL 32611, 352-273-0706, Fax: 352-392-9253, pricek@law.ufl.edu

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A4 - Build It Right and They Will Come: The Librarian's Role in Library Construction

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Professor Kelsh will identify some of the major responsibilities a law librarian or academic administrative leader might assume in a library construction or renovation project. She will attempt to provide useful information about the construction process from the owner/client point of view and offer strategies to help survive the process. Librarian building roles include programming, planning, and project management responsibilities. This presentation is based on an award-winning paper in the 2005 AALL LexisNexis Call for Papers Open Division writing competition.

Virginia Kelsh, Professor Emerita, University of San Francisco, 75 Camino Arroyo South, Palm Desert, CA 92260, 760-835-3536, kelsh@usfca.edu

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A5 - The Faculty Role in Planning New Facilities—Must There Be a Wet Bar and a Fireplace in Every Faculty Office?

What is the role of the faculty member on the building design team? How does a faculty member communicate the unique needs of the faculty for teaching and office space to a design team, often made up of non-academic designers and architects with no academic experience? What are the issues you should expect and how shall you proceed? Do you have a different role if you are chairing the committee? What are the roles of the Dean and the Building Committee? Faculty from a public and a private law school will share their experience as faculty representatives, the issues they faced, and how they communicated effectively and addressed these throughout the building design process.

William R. Andersen, Professor Emeritus, Judson Falknor Professor, University of Washington School of Law, William H. Gates Hall, Box 353020, Seattle, WA 98195, 206-543-9385, Fax: 206-543-5671, ander@u.washington.edu

Eric Chiappinelli, Associate Dean for Alumni and Professional Relations and Professor of Law, Sullivan Hall, Seattle University School of Law, 901 12th Avenue, P.O. Box 222000, Seattle, Washington 98122-1090, 206-398-4025, echiap@seattleu.edu

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B1- Interior Design—In House or Independent?

Dean Rudolph C. Hasl will lead a discussion about the selection of an interior design specialist to coordinate the finishing touches of a construction or renovation project, as well as the selection of furniture and fixtures to create the aesthetic impact that carries out the architectural concept. The program will explore the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing an interior designer who is a part of the architectural design team or the construction company, compared with an independent interior designer hired by the law school on the University.

Rudolph C. Hasl, Dean & President, Thomas Jefferson School of Law, 2121 San Diego Ave., San Diego, CA 92110, 619-297-9700, hasl@tjsl.edu

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B2 - Building Technology

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This session focuses on infrastructure technologies necessary for new buildings and renovation projects including but not limited to wired and wireless data networks, traditional and voice over IP telephone systems, audiovisual and cable TV networks, one-card systems for vending and access control, security cameras, fire alarms and public announcement systems, data centers and audiovisual control rooms, and telecommunication closets in law school academic buildings, libraries, dorms, sport and fitness centers, and libraries.

Moderator: Pablo G. Molina, Chief Information Officer, Georgetown University Law Center, 600 New Jersey Ave., Washington, DC 20001, 202-662-9004, Fax: 202-662-9400, molina@law.georgetown.edu

Speaker: Tom Delaney, Associate Dean for Information and Technology & Chief Information Officer, NYU School of Law, 110 West 3rd Street, Room 106, New York, NY 10012, 212-992-8851, Fax: 212-995-4882, tom.delaney@nyu.edu

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B3 - Working with the University’s Strategic Plan

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University decisions about law school construction projects increasingly turn on how law school needs fit within the University’s master facilities plan. University administrators turn to these master plans for guidance about the location and priorities of projects. This panel will explore that process. Speakers will include a member of one of the leading architectural/planning firms in the U.S. who will discuss the goals of the process and how plans are put together. A University facilities vice president and a provost will then discuss the role law schools can play a role in this planning process, and how to maximize chances of successfully building the building the law school needs when it needs to do so.

Mike Barber, AIA, Senior Associate, Ayers/Saint/Gross, 1040 Hull Street, Suite 100, Baltimore, MD 21230, 410-347-8500 x123, Fax: 410-347-8519, mbarber@asg-architects.com

Jack T. Sidener, University of Hawaii, William S. Richardson School of Law, 2515 Dole Street, Honolulu, HI, 96822, (800) 956-3511, Fax: (808) 956-7778, sidener@hawaii.edu

 Rayman Solomon, Dean, Rutgers University-Camden, School of Law, 217 North Fifth Street,, Camden, NJ, 8102, (856) 225-6191, Fax: (856) 225-6487, raysol@camlaw.rutgers.edu

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B4 - Distance Education and the Implications for Physical Facilities

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As a national expert on the creative uses of technology for instructional purposes, Professor Stephen Burnett will lead a panel presentation and a demonstration of what is necessary in the design of the physical facilities and in the acquisition of technological equipment to have an effective synchronous distance education program that engages the student and provides for a stimulating academic experience. Participants will include Barry Currier, currently Dean of the Concord Law School, and Professor Steve Nickles, C. C. Hope Chair of Financial Services and Law at Wake Forest University, who will participate from Wake Forest University School of Law.

Stephen Burnett, Associate Dean for Business Development, Concord Law School, 10866 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 1200, Los Angeles, CA 90024, 310-689-3209, sburnett@kaplan.edu

Barry A. Currier, Dean, Concord Law School, 10866 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 1200, Los Angeles, CA 90024, 310-689-3200, barry_currier@concord.kaplan.edu

Steve H. Nickles, C. C. Hope Chair of Financial Services and Law, Wake Forest University School of Law, Worrell Professional Center, P.O.Box 7206, Winston-Salem, NC 27109-7206, 336-758-4296, snickles@law.wfu.edu

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B5 - Aligning Strategic Planning and Facility Planning

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Programming for a new building or renovation is an extension of the law school’s mission and strategic planning. The Law School goals and ambitions regarding pedagogy, student services, scholarship, library, technology, and support services must be developed and integrated into the process. Successful programming requires that architects understand a law school’s history and direction. Space templates and comparisons with other schools are helpful only afterwards. Architects must be familiar with the law school’s planning process, and they must understand the direction key decision makers want to pursue and the dreams of the entire community. Familiarity with the school’s Strategic Plan is the first step. The speakers will present an integrated approach to developing space needs programming.

Wallace J. Mlyniec, Georgetown University Law Center, Lupo-Ricci Professor of Clinical Studies, Chair, Campus Completion Committee, 111 F. Street NW, Washington, DC 20001, 202-662-9590, Fax: 202-662-4244, mlyniec@law.georgetown.edu

Carole Wedge, Architect, Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott, 40 Broad Street, Boston, MA 02109, 617-423-1700, Fax: 617-451-2420, cwedge@sbra.com

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B6 - Green Buildings, ex post facto: Looking Back into the Future

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Participants will learn about the choices and challenges faced during the design and operation of Wood Hall at Lewis & Clark Law School, a 40,000 square foot award winning building completed in January 2002. Led by Portland architect and green building designer Jon Wiener, the discussion will focus on what worked, what hasn’t and what we would do differently next time. The building was designed to comply with the LEED silver standard while not submitting for official certification; the value of the LEED process and certification will be discussed. Lewis & Clark librarian and green building office dweller Tami Gierloff will also give her perspective on the practicalities of working in a green building.

Tami Gierloff, Assistant Dean and Associate Director, Paul L. Boley Law Library, Lewis & Clark Law School, 10015 SW Terwilliger Blvd., Portland, OR 97219, 503-768-6775, Fax: 503-768-6898, gierloff@lclark.edu

 Jon H Wiener, Principal AIA, SRG Partnership, 621 SW Morrison, Portland, OR 97205, 503-222-1917, Fax: 503-294-0272, jwiener@srgpartnership.com, www.srgpartnership.com

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C1 - Good Needs Assessment: Great Library Program—Getting It All Together

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Perhaps the most indispensable first step that a library director can take toward making a case for library construction is to prepare a good needs assessment. A needs assessment is a document that carefully chronicles the shortcomings of the current facility and makes suggestions toward remedying perceived problems. A well-developed library program relies heavily on the information found in the needs assessment to specify criteria to correct these deficiencies. Between formulating the needs assessment and drafting the library program there can be pitfalls that should be avoided. In this session the speakers will offer advice on how to prepare useful documents that will result in a successful library design.

Lee Coyle, AIA, Vice President, Cannon Design, Mid Atlantic Region, 509 South Exeter Street, Floor Five, Baltimore, Maryland 21202, 410.234.1155, Fax 410.234.1160, lcoyle@cannondesign.com

Stephen Margeton, Professor. and Library Director, Judge Kathryn J. DuFour Law Library, Catholic University of America, 3600 John McCormack Road, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20064, 202-319-5116, Fax: 202-319-4447, margeton@law.cua.edu

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C2 - Workshop on Financing Building Projects at a Public Law School

This workshop will explore the many issues of securing financing for law school construction projects. This is designed as a totally participatory workshop. Attendees are encouraged to bring questions for the group and to engage in the discussion.

John Meyer, Vice Chancellor for Resource Management, Office of Resource Management and Planning, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, 376 Mrak Hall, Davis, California 95616, 530-752 7941, Fax 530-752-5808, jameyer@ucdavis.edu

Rex R. Perschbacher, Dean, UC Davis School of Law, 400 Mrak Hall Drive, Davis, CA 95616-5201, 530-752-0243, Fax: 530-752-7279, rrperschbacher@ucdavis.edu

Rayman Solomon, Dean, Rutgers University-Camden, School of Law, 217 North Fifth Street,, Camden, NJ, 8102, (856) 225-6191, Fax: (856) 225-6487, raysol@camlaw.rutgers.edu

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C3 - The Pleasures and Pitfalls of Classroom Design

This session will cover all aspects of classroom design, from seating configurations to integration of technology. Set in a lively debate format the group will move through several classrooms in William H. Gates Hall with one presenter pointing out the highlights of the room while the other emphasizes the lowlights. Along with seating and technology, this session will cover ADA issues, podium design issues, trial advocacy classroom concerns, mixed classroom/courtroom issues, flexible vs. fixed seating, wired vs. wireless networks, modesty panels, desktop materials, and anything else you might have questions about.

You will never be able to look at a classroom the same way again.

Jonathan Franklin, Associate Law Librarian, Marian Gould Gallagher Law Library, University of Washington School of Law, Box 353025, Seattle, WA 98195, 206-543-4089, Fax: 206-685-2165, jafrank@u.washington.edu

Penny A. Hazelton, Associate Dean for Library and Computing Services, Marian Gould Gallagher Law Library, University of Washington School of Law, Box 353025, Seattle, WA 98195, 206-543-4089, Fax: 206-685-2165, pennyh@u.washington.edu

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C4 - Student Computing

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This session discusses computing services for students including help and media services desks, technology training rooms, computer labs, collaboration spaces, journal and clinic technologies, wireless services, printing services, one-card services for vending and access control, event announcement systems, videoconferencing services, class pod casting services, and video editing services in law school academic buildings, libraries, dorms, sport and fitness centers, and libraries. The speakers will offer east-west, public-private views and approaches.

Moderator: Pablo G. Molina, Chief Information Officer, Georgetown University Law Center, 600 New Jersey Ave., Washington, DC 20001, 202-662-9004, Fax: 202-662-9400, molina@law.georgetown.edu

Patricia Donnelly, CIO and Director, Boalt Law School, 368 Boalt Hall, Berkeley CA 94720-7200, 510-643-6872, Fax: 510-642-0496, pdonnelly@law.berkeley.edu

Susan Monsen, Director of Computer Services, Yale Law School, Box 208215, New Haven, CT 06520-8215, 203-432-4044, Fax: 203-432-2575, susan.monsen@yale.edu

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D1 - University of Washington Clinics Workspace Design

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A working law office within the Law School, the suite of the Clinical Law Program must accommodate more than 80 law students per year, fourteen faculty and staff, as well as members of the public. The suite’s student workspaces, private offices, interview rooms, conference rooms, networked computers, communications and integrated audiovisual systems are designed to satisfy this variety of needs. Is this design a success? See for yourself during a brief introduction, Q & A and tour of the suite.

Scott Schumacher, Director, Low Income Taxpayer Clinic, University of Washington School of Law, William H. Gates Hall, Box 353020, Seattle, WA, 98195, 206-685-6802, Fax: 206-685-2388, sschum@u.washington.edu, www.law.washington.edu/clinics

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D2 - Students First: Student Spaces at the UW Law School

Planning or remodeling a facility requires the planners to consider faculty, administration, staff, library, classroom, and student spaces. Do students ever come out on top? Do they just get the left-over space with no natural light that does not quite meet their needs? See for yourself whether the UW put law students first in the design of William H. Gates Hall as a discussion of these issues is followed by a tour of student spaces in Gates Hall.

You will be able to answer the question, “What is the remote learning room?”

Mohamed Rali Badissy, 3L, University of Washington School of Law, 4320 Aurora Ave N, Apt 303N, Seattle, WA 98103, badissy@gmail.com

Penny A. Hazelton, Professor and Associate Dean for Library and Computing Services, University of Washington School of Law, Gallagher Law Library, Box 353025, Seattle, WA 98195-3025, 206-543-4089, Fax: 206-685-2165, pennyh@u.washington.edu

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D3 - Telling the Law School’s Story—with a Little Help from Friends and Donors

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Part 2 [PowerPoint .ppt]
Part 3 [PowerPoint .pps]

Recognition of donors, outstanding alumni, and significant members of the law school community both attracts loyalty to the school and assists in continuous fundraising for building, renovating and new programs. A consultant on integrated donor recognition systems will discuss their planning and funding; a private school administrator will discuss the use of multimedia kiosks to tell the law school’s story; and a state law school administrator will discuss donor recognition from naming opportunities to donor walls and dedication events on a budget.

Moderator: Kathie Price, Associate Dean for Library and Technology and Clarence J. TeSelle, Professor of Law, Fredric G. Levin College of Law, University of Florida, PO Box 117620, Gainesville, FL 32611, 352-273-0706, Fax: 352-392-9253, pricek@law.ufl.edu

Thomas A. Morrison
, Senior Associate Dean, Administrative Affairs, George Washington University School of Law, 2000 H St. NW, Washington, DC 20052, 202-994-6288, Fax 202-994-515, tmorrison@law.gwu.edu

Patrick Shannon, Associate Dean, Administrative Affairs and Lecturer, Fredric G. Levin College of Law, University of Florida, PO Box 117620, Gainesville, FL 32611, 352-273-0611, Fax 352-392-872, shannon@law.ufl.edu

Robin E. Williams, Principal Consultant, Robin E. Williams, Incorporated, 1280 Peachtree St. NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30309-3502, 404-872-7646, Fax: 404-872-7884 robin@rewinc.com

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D4 - Building Security and Safety as a “Starting Point”

The security of the building and it’s occupants is a major concern for any building, but often not the first thing we think about when we begin the planning process. While your campus environment and location may dictate the level of security you build into your building, issues such as active or passive entry points, interior and exterior lighting, internal security zones and equipment security are often overlooked till after the initial design phase. This program will examine the options available for addressing these issues and various hardware and technology solutions to providing a safe environment for the protection of building occupants and equipment.

Michael Sletten, Director, Public Safety and Transportation, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, P.O. Box 222000, Seattle, Washington 98122-1090, 206-296-5990, sletten@seattleu.edu

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D5 - Building Technology

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This session focuses on infrastructure technologies necessary for new buildings and renovation projects including but not limited to wired and wireless data networks, traditional and voice over IP telephone systems, audiovisual and cable TV networks, one-card systems for vending and access control, security cameras, fire alarms and public announcement systems, data centers and audiovisual control rooms, and telecommunication closets in law school academic buildings, libraries, dorms, sport and fitness centers, and libraries.

Moderator: Pablo G. Molina, Chief Information Officer, Georgetown University Law Center, 600 New Jersey Ave., Washington, DC 20001, 202-662-9004, Fax: 202-662-9400, molina@law.georgetown.edu

Speaker: Tom Delaney, Associate Dean for Information and Technology & Chief Information Officer, NYU School of Law, 110 West 3rd Street, Room 106, New York, NY 10012, 212-992-8851, Fax: 212-995-4882, tom.delaney@nyu.edu

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E1 - Paradigms Lost: Thinking about Library Space in an Evolving Information Environment

Technology, digitization, ABA standards, changing student and faculty demographics, and new research and curricular agendas have all coalesced to create a perfect storm for design change of academic law libraries.

Modern academic law library design must respond to a wide array of changes:

Legal scholarship moves from doctrinal to transdisciplinary; the student population grows more feminized and diverse; graduate programs, institutes, interdisciplinary programs grow, as does the administration that run these increasingly complex organizations; the changing of law school economics from the quasi-privatization of public law schools to the growth of the for-profit law school; collection development policies move from ownership to access; and, the library becomes a service provider rather than a storage facility. This program will discuss these challenges and the potential for radically new law library design in this evolving environment.

Donna Barry, Design Principal, Gould Evans Associates, 3136 North 3rd Ave., Phoenix, AZ, 602-234-1140

Michael Chiorazzi, Professor of Law and Information, Resources and Library Science, Associate Dean for Information Resources, Editor, Legal Reference Services Quarterly, Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona, 1201 E. Speedway Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721, 520-621-5477, Fax: 520-621-3138, michael.chiorazzi@law.arizona.edu

Dick Danner, Senior Associate Dean for Information Services, Archibald C. & Frances Fulk Rufty, Research Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law, Box 90361, Durham NC 27708-0361, 919-613-7115, Fax: 919-613-7237, danner@law.duke.edu, http://www.law.duke.edu/fac/danner

Trudi Hummel, AIA, Principal, Gould Evans Associates, 3136 North 3rd Ave., Phoenix, AZ, 602-234-1140  

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E2 - Selecting Furnishings

Part 1 [PowerPoint .ppt]
Part 2 [PowerPoint .ppt]

The independent design consultant for Yale Law Library’s furniture, a library director who lost the battle for a desired vendor and had to modify the resulting knock offs and a director who had to choose between off the shelf v. custom furniture will discuss their experiences from design through bidding, delivery and installation.

Moderator and Speaker: Richard A. Leiter, Director, Library and Professor, University of Nebraska College of Law, PO Box 830902, Lincoln, NE 68583, 402-472-2161, Fax 402-472-5185, rleiter@unl.edu

George Pike, Director, Library and Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh School of Law, 3900 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, 412-648-1400, Fax 412-648-2647 pike@law.pitt.edu

Maria Zawadsky, H2Z Design, LLC, PO Box 339, Harwinton, CT 06791, 860-485-0080, Fax 860-485-0353, info@h2zdesign.com

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E3 - What You Have Always Wanted to Know about Parking Structures

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As a developer who has successfully managed the construction of various parking facilities throughout the country, Sandy Kahn will present a program to highlight factors that need to be considered in developing parking facilities, including site selection, planning, zoning approvals, costs, financing, operations and maintenance, and entrepreneurial partnership opportunities.

Samuel (Sandy) J. Kahn, Kent Holdings & Enterprises, P.O.Box 787, Solano Beach, CA 92075, 858-792-5500, sjkahn@archwireless.net

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E4 - Workshop on Financing Building Projects at a Private Law School

Part 1 [PowerPoint .ppt]
Part 2 [PowerPoint .ppt]

This workshop will explore the many issues of securing financing for law school construction projects. This is designed as a totally participatory workshop. Attendees are encouraged to bring questions for the group and to engage in the discussion

Denis Ransmeier, Vice President for Business & Finance/Treasurer, Lewis & Clark College, 0615 Southwest Palatine Hill Road, Portland OR 97219, 503-768-7697, Fax: 503-768-7805

Steven R. Smith, President, Dean and Professor, California Western School of Law, 225 Cedar Street, San Diego, CA 92101, 619-239-0391, Fax: 619-525-7092, www.cwsl.edu

Rayman Solomon, Dean, Rutgers University-Camden, School of Law, 217 North Fifth Street,, Camden, NJ, 8102, (856) 225-6191, Fax: (856) 225-6487, raysol@camlaw.rutgers.edu

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E5 - Designing a Great Law School Podium

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This session will address podium design issues from the perspective of the room design, the technology infrastructure, and the divergent teaching styles of law school faculty. In particular, it will look at the Creston system as a way to increase podium flexibility while making the individual players and technology pieces easily replaceable.

Jonathan Franklin, Associate Law Librarian, Marian Gould Gallagher Law Library, University of Washington School of Law, Box 353025, Seattle, WA 98195, 206-543-4089, Fax: 206-685-2165, jafrank@u.washington.edu

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F1 - Like Coffee and Seattle: How User and Collection Spaces Work Together

Part 1 [PowerPoint .ppt]
Part 2 [PowerPoint .ppt]

Seattleites love coffee and coffee is part of the Seattle landscape in a real way. Library user space and collection spaces in law libraries have a similar symbiotic relationship - two very dissimilar organisms living in an intimate relationship.

Two law librarians who have recently and continually built and redesigned library space will share their observations and challenges as the inevitable tensions between user and collection spaces arise. Topics to be covered are using the collection as an architectural element; shaping user behavior through collection placement; influence of collection type on user furnishings; how to design user and collection space that can unfold as collections and user needs change.

Only you can decide if Seattle is to coffee as library collection space is to library user space.

Kristin Cheney, Executive Law Librarian, Seattle University Law Library, Sullivan Hall 900 Broadway, Seattle, WA 98122-4540, 206-398-4091, Fax: 206-398-4194, kcheney@seattleu.edu

Penny A. Hazelton, Professor, Associate Dean for Library and Computing Services University of Washington School of Law, Gallagher Law Library, Box 353025 Seattle, WA 98195-3025, 206-543-4089 Fax: 206-685-2165, pennyh@u.washington.edu

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F2 - The Responsibilities of the Owner’s Representative in Managing a Construction Project

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Successful management of a construction project depends on an effective working relationship among the owner, the architect, and the contractor. Each of these three parties has a role to play during construction. This session will cover the role of the owner’s representative in this tripartite relationship. The owner’s representative must always be ready to make decisions promptly and furnish information expeditiously in response to questions from either the architect or the contractor. These decisions bind the owner regarding changes in work and changes in schedules. The focus of the session will be on how to successfully fulfill the role of owner’s representative - through understanding the role of each of the three parties during construction, through monitoring construction progress in regular O-A-C (owner-architect-contractor) meetings, and through working with the architect and contractor for a timely and successful completion of the project. The presenters have both been involved in law school construction projects as owner’s representatives or representative-designees.

Jonathan Franklin, Associate Law Librarian, Marian Gould Gallagher Law Library University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, WA 98195, 206-543-4089 Fax: 206-685-2165, jafrank@u.washington.edu

James Hambleton, Associate Dean, Budget and Planning, Texas Wesleyan University School of Law, 1515 Commerce Street, Fort Worth, Texas 76102, 817-212-3818, jhambleton@law.txwes.edu

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F3 - Law Schools as Social Venues

[PowerPoint .ppt]

The demands of modern law school programs include professional conferences, moot court competitions, student events, donor dinners, and everything in between. “Where to put the caterers?” is no idle query. Panelists Joan Vorrasi and Mark Maves attempt to cover the landscape of designing spaces that must serve as venues for both educational purposes and social events. Among the issues to be discussed are designing specific social spaces, planning for caterer support, storing food and beverage supplies, housing equipment, installing sound systems, converting classrooms and/or courtrooms into auditorium space, accommodating multiple events, as well as dealing with unforeseen requirements for meeting spaces after moving into a new law building.

Mark Maves, AIA, Sr. Principal, Smith Group, 1825 Eye St. N.W., #250 Washington, DC 20006, 202-842-2100, Fax: 202-974-4500, mmaves@smithgroup.com

Joan Vorrasi, Director of Student Life & Special Events, Columbus School of Law Catholic University of America, 3600 John McCormack Road, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20064, 202-319-6126, Fax: 202-319-4470, vorrasi@law.edu

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G1 - Repurposing Law School & Library Space: Renovating in a Finite World

Part 1 [PowerPoint .ppt]
Part 2 [PowerPoint .ppt]
Part 3 [PowerPoint .ppt]

As needs evolve within a law school, space often becomes an issue. When it is not possible to build a completely new building or add a major addition, space within the current facility needs to be rearranged to make way for new programs, a growing faculty, increased collections, technology and student needs. Law school politics, pressures, tensions, and needs beyond those of just the library may influence the outcomes of such projects.

At Syracuse pressing needs to provide office space for nine new faculty and to better serve the study space demands of students resulted in a reconfiguration of law library space to allow for the construction of a three person office suite and additional group study rooms. S. Blair Kauffman will address some of the broader, political issues surrounding renovation projects conducted to repurpose space in the finite law school.

Jan Fleckenstein, Associate Director & Head of Library Information Systems, Syracuse University College of Law, H. Douglas Barclay Law Library, E.I. White Hall, Syracuse, NY 13244-1030, 315-443-9571, Fax: 315-443-9567, jflecken@law.syr.edu

Thomas R. French, Director & Associate Professor, Syracuse University College of Law, H. Douglas Barclay Law Library, Syracuse, NY 13244-1030, 315-443-9571, Fax: 315-443-9567, trfrench@law.syr.edu

S. Blair Kauffman, Director of Law Library and Professor of Law, Yale Law School, Lillian Goldman Library, P.O. Box 208215, 127 Wall St., New Haven, CT 06520-8215, 203-432-1601, Fax: 203-432-2112, blair.kauffman@yale.edu

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G2 - Law School Design: The Inspiration for Sullivan Hall

[PowerPoint .ppt]

Every building evolves from the inspiration of the architect. Rick Sundberg and Scott Allen will discuss the design inspiration behind Sullivan Hall, home of the Seattle University School of Law. Combining vision, with the curricular, co-curricular and social environment of the law school community are key elements to a well designed law school. The key elements involved in the Sullivan Hall design will be reviewed, along with a tour of the building and its art collection.

Scott Allen, Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects, 159 South Jackson Street Sixth Floor, Seattle, Washington 98104, 206-624-5670

Rick Sundberg, Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects, 159 South Jackson Street Sixth Floor, Seattle, Washington 98104, 206-624-5670

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G3 - Student-Centric Law School Design

Part 1 [PowerPoint .ppt]
Part 2 [PowerPoint .ppt]
Part 3 [PowerPoint .ppt]

New and renovated law school buildings are much more student-centric than in the past. Law students place greater demands on buildings and staffs, believing higher tuition dollars should earn them more perks. Accommodating student organizations, food service, school mail, wireless networking, lockers, parking, security, and social space requires juggling many design priorities. Panelists Joan Vorrasi and Mark Maves will discuss design solutions for keeping students happy, as well as some features that sparkled on paper, but fizzled quickly upon building occupancy.

Mark Maves, AIA, Sr. Principal, Smith Group, 1825 Eye St. N.W., #250, Washington, DC 20006, 202-842-2100, Fax: 202-974-4500, mmaves@smithgroup.com

Joan Vorrasi, Director of Student Life & Special Events, Columbus School of Law Catholic University of America, 3600 John McCormack Road, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20064, 202-319-6126, Fax: 202-319-4470, vorrasi@law.edu

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G4 - Planning Your Specs and Communicating with Your Architect: How to Say What You Want and Get What You Say

[PowerPoint .ppt]

How do you translate the generalities of ‘more space’ and ‘better space’, and ‘hi-tech’ into concrete specifications that your architect can work into a viable building program? How do you begin to parse out your vision for the future into desk size and shelf-feet? How do you set priorities for spatial relationships? Architects and law schools must help each other understand what the other’s world requires for success. It’s not exactly Mars and Venus, but communication expectations and terminology between academics and architects do differ. We must learn from each other if we want the result to sustain the vision.

Participants will come away with a better understanding of how to plan for, prepare and build a specifications list, and how to work with an architect to turn those specifications into a workable building program.

Margaret L. Christiansen, Esq., Assistant Director, Regent University School of Law Library, 1000 Regent University Drive, Virginia Beach, VA 23464, 757-226-4463, Fax: 757-226-4451, margchr@regent.edu

Stuart H. Lobel, CID, ASID, Hardwicke Associates, Inc., 8001 Franklin Farms Drive, Suite 200, Richmond, VA 23229, 804-282-0788, Fax: 804-282-0499, stuat@hai-design.com

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H1 - See Me, Hear Me: Lighting and Acoustics in Library Space

[Adobe .pdf]

Librarians are well aware that nothing annoys patrons more than poor lighting and unwanted noise. Yet librarians typically leave these important design details solely in the hands of the architect. Here’s an opportunity to learn the basics of good lighting and practical methods for reducing sound intrusion that should result in truly inviting study spaces. Architect Jeffrey Scherer discusses major lighting and acoustical issues and suggests questions for the client to ask when reviewing architectural plans. Questions and answers will follow the presentation

Jeffrey A. Scherer, FAIA, Meyer, Sherer & Rockcastle, Ltd., Architecture & Interior Design, 710 South 2nd Street, 7th Floor, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55401-2294, 612.375.0336, 612.342.2216, Jeffrey@msrltd.com

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H2 - Sullivan Hall Classroom Technology

[PowerPoint .ppt]

Changes in technology, ongoing maintenance and space renovation all have an impact on the classroom teaching experience. Ms. Zimmerman will review the classroom technology in Sullivan Hall and how it supports the academic mission of the law school. The specific equipment and services will be reviewed in relation to available options and choices that have been made within context of the classroom setting, and the necessary technology work space to support the operation.

Stephanie Zimmerman, Associate Director Media Services, School of Law, Sullivan Hall, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, Seattle, Washington 98122, 206-398-4180, zimmermans@seattleu.edu

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H3 - A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to New Quarters: Temporary Space Options

Part 1 [PowerPoint .ppt]
Part 2 [PowerPoint .ppt]
Part 3 [Quicktime movie .mov]

To move off campus or stay in place during renovation has pros and cons that are addressed by a project manager who dealt with selecting and renovating temporary space, code compliance, and moving 30 people while keeping a construction project going; an administrator who planned and executed a move offsite; and an administrator whose library moved within a building being constructed.

Arthur (Rick) Donnelly, Associate Director, Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center Fredric G. Levin College of Law, University of Florida, PO Box 117628, Gainesville, FL 32611-7628, 352-273-0703, Fax 352-392-9253, donnelly@law.ufl.edu

Howie Ferguson, Facilities Planning, University of Florida, 232 Stadium, Gainesville, FL 32611, 352-294-0078, hsferg@ufl.edu

Richard A. Leiter, Director, Library and Professor, University of Nebraska College of Law, PO Box 830902, Lincoln, NE 68583, 402-472-2161, Fax 402-472-5185, rleiter@unl.edu

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H4 - Building Design: Adapting to Programmatic Changes

Part 1 [PowerPoint .ppt]
Part 2 [PowerPoint .ppt]

Finally, after years of design and construction you move into your new building only to find out that you don’t fit. Programmatic additions, along with new staff and faculty have outgrown the original building design requirements. A building should be designed to meet changing needs over time. Program presenters will discuss the specific changes that have occurred to Sullivan Hall in the past six years within the footprint of the building and review lessons learned about planning for change and growth. Specific renovations, including a new faculty office wing, renovation of office space for increased density and future options for increased space will be discussed.

Richard Bird, Associate Dean for Finance & Administration, Seattle University School of Law, Sullivan Hall 210G, 900 Broadway, Seattle, WA 98122, 206-398-4060, rbird@seattleu.edu

John Kennedy, Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects, 159 South Jackson Street Sixth Floor, Seattle, Washington 98104, 206-624-5670

Rick Sundberg, Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects, 159 South Jackson Street Sixth Floor, Seattle, Washington 98104, 206-624-5670

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I1 - The Law School Clinic Modeled After a Law Firm

The Ronald Peterson Law Clinic located in Sullivan Hall is designed like an actual stand alone law firm. With its own storefront access on the street, the layout of this office includes all of the spaces required for a firm. Law clinic faculty and students exist in this space that houses its own faculty offices, student work space, interview rooms and support staff space. The presenters will discuss the benefits of having such an office arrangement within the educational setting, along with the limitations.

Paul Holland, Assistant Professor of Law, Seattle University School of Law, Sullivan Hall, 901 12th Avenue, P.O. Box 222000, Seattle, Washington 98122-1090, 206-398-4135, hollandp@seattleu.edu

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I2 - Student Roundtable

How does a law school building support our students’ academic experience? A Seattle University School of Law student leader panel will share their experiences at Law School in relation to how the building structure and physical amenities have been a support to their education. The community, co-curricular, classroom, study and personal spaces will be discussed as to the extent it has had on the students’ educational experience.

Richard Bird, Associate Dean for Finance & Administration, Seattle University School of Law, Sullivan Hall 210G, 900 Broadway, Seattle, WA 98122, 206-398-4060, rbird@seattleu.edu

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I3 - Workplace/Workspace: Design Considerations for Staff Organizational Effectiveness

[PowerPoint .ppt]

New construction or a building remodel presents an organization with a chance to either create a fresh physical image or simply design more effective work spaces. In either case, it’s an opportunity to place architecture at the service of institutional goals and objectives. Library staff spaces are among the most misunderstood spaces in any library plan. They are in fact unique; the occupants of these offices perform many non-traditional functions and have relationships to other departments that may not be apparent from an organizational chart. The speakers will briefly review the basic concepts of workspace planning for knowledge workers; explore general staff space issues for both public and technical services staff; and, offer a brief glimpse into the future of the work sphere.

Richard M. Jost, Assistant Librarian for Technical Services, Lecturer, The Information School, University of Washington Gallagher Law Library, William H. Gates Hall, Box 353025, Seattle, WA 98195-3025, 206-221-6114, Fax: 206-685-2165, rmjost@u.washington.edu

A. Robert Menanteaux, Information Services Librarian, Seattle University Law Library, 901 12th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98122, 206-398-4160, Fax: 206-398-4194, arobertm@seattleu.edu

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I4 - Courtroom Design to meet Educational Objectives

The courtroom in a Law School is more than a courtroom. This space serves as a model teaching facility for trial courses, a classroom for other classes and as a co-curricular space for student organizations, such as moot court, and occasionally for visiting court proceedings. This program will review the necessary design elements for each of these uses and discuss how they can be integrated into one facility, along with the assistance of updated technology.

John Strait, Associate Professor of Law, Sullivan Hall, Seattle University School of Law, 901 12th Avenue, P.O. Box 222000, Seattle, Washington 98122-1090, 206-398-4027, straitj@seattleu.edu

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I5 - Law School Design: The Inspiration for Sullivan Hall

[PowerPoint .ppt]

Every building evolves from the inspiration of the architect. Rick Sundberg and Scott Allen, principals at Olsen, Sundberg, Kundig, Allen, will discuss the design inspiration behind Sullivan Hall, home of the Seattle University School of Law. Combining vision, with the curricular, co-curricular and social environment of the law school community are key elements to a well designed law school. The key elements involved in the Sullivan Hall design will be reviewed, along with a tour of the building and its art collection.

Scott Allen, Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects, 159 South Jackson Street, Sixth Floor, Seattle, Washington 98104, 206-624-5670

Rick Sundberg, Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects, 159 South Jackson Street, Sixth Floor, Seattle, Washington 98104, 206-624-5670

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I6 - Communication Technology

[PowerPoint .ppt]

A review of the Seattle University School of Law in house communication system, known publicly as “The Docket,” that allows for the gathering, storage and display of information. The session will cover the distribution of this information throughout the School of Law, and its impact on the building design, including the building directory, calendar and web portal. This integrated technology solution has reduced the need for traditional paper displays throughout the building.

James Cooper, Director Technology and Media Services, School of Law, Sullivan Hall Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, Seattle Washington 98122, 206-398-4170

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